Disaster Preparation

May 25, 2022

Hurricane Preparedness

1) Determine Your Risk

 

 Find out today what types of wind and water hazards could happen where you live, and then start preparing how to handle them. Hurricanes are not just a coastal problem. impacts from wind and water can be felt hundreds of miles inland, and significant impacts can occur regardless of the storm’s strength. Know if you live in an area prone to flooding and if you’re safe to remain in your home. 

2) Develop an Evacuation Plan 

Develop an Evacuation Plan (Hurricane Preparedness) | National Oceanic and  Atmospheric Administration
Find out if you live in a hurricane evacuation zone. You may also need to leave if you live in a flood prone area or in a mobile home outside a hurricane evacuation zone. Now is the time to begin planning where you would go and how you would get there.
You do not need to travel hundreds of miles. Your destination could be a friend or relative who lives in a well built home outside flood prone areas. Remember, your safest place may be to remain home.  Be sure to account for your pets in your plan.
As hurricane season approaches, listen to local officials on questions related to how you may need to adjust any evacuation plans based on the latest health and safety guidelines from the CDC and your local officials.

3) Assemble Disaster Supplies 

Assemble Disaster Supplies (Hurricane Preparedness) | National Oceanic and  Atmospheric Administration

Whether you’re evacuating or sheltering-in-place, you’re going to need supplies not just to get through the storm but for the potentially lengthy and unpleasant aftermath. Have enough non-perishable food, water and medicine to last each person in your family a minimum of 3 days (store a longer than 3-day supply of water, if possible). Electricity and water could be out for at least that long. You’ll need extra cash, a battery-powered radio and flashlights. You may need a portable crank or solar-powered USB charger for your cell phones.

4) Get an Insurance Checkup 

Get an Insurance Checkup (Hurricane Preparedness) | National Oceanic and  Atmospheric Administration
Call your insurance company or agent and ask for an insurance check-up to make sure you have enough insurance to repair or even replace your home and/or belongings. Remember, home and renters insurance doesn’t cover flooding, so you’ll need a separate policy for it. 

Phone:  302.644.7810

Email:  Traviswyshock@gmail.com

 5) Strengthen Your Home

Strengthen Your Home (Hurricane Preparedness) | National Oceanic and  Atmospheric Administration

Whether you’re evacuating, or planning to ride out the storm in your home, make sure it is in good repair and up to local hurricane building code specifications to withstand wind impacts. Many retrofits are not as costly or time consuming as you may think. 

Have the proper plywood, steel or aluminum panels to board up the windows and doors. Remember, the garage door is the most vulnerable part of the home, so it must be able to withstand the winds. 

Read more